recent findings: Product design management, jQuery sliders, and color sound synaesthesia

Testing out the embedly wordpress plugin.  These are a few pages I’ve recently visited that I’ve learned from.

1) There is a lot I can pick up from Julie Zhou’s blog. She is involved in product design and management.  Good product people are as essential as the best developers in growing a company.

A Manager’s Manifesto – The Year of the Looking Glass10) Always get the full story before making a decision. 9) It’s incredibly easy to ‘flip the switch’ and start writing people off after a few bad experiences. Resist at all costs. You were bumbling once too. You made poor decisions. You learn and grow, and so does everybody else.

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2) Noura pointed me to an awesome tutorial for jQuery sliders. I’ve been making browser synths so I’m pumped to learn more about building nice UIs.

Colorful Sliders With jQuery & CSS3 | TutorialzineColorful Sliders With jQuery & CSS3 Martin Angelov jQuery Trickshots is our new epic jQuery tips and tricks book. Check it out! In this tutorial we are using jQuery and the new transformation features brought by CSS3 to create a three dimensional dynamic slider effect.

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3) I love the color sound synaesthesia Neil Harbisson talks about. The matching of hue to pitch makes sense. I wonder how the mapping could be adjusted to take into account sonic harmonies and color harmonies.  Or how saturation and lightness can affect the sound too.

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Making a simple sitemap on WordPress

I wanted a simple hands on way to make a site map. On an SEO point of view, a site map makes a website easier to read for search engines. To me, an even more important use for it is that it is a simple interface for a human to see everything on the website.  No images, just a list.  Since all of the posts in my blog fall into categories, I simply listed out the posts by category, placing the categories in an order I liked. If you have created a taxonomy in a similar way, this method may be useful for you.  Here’s how to do it. (Note: You’ll need shell access)

The first thing I did was create a WordPress Page for it, and call it “Sitemap”. You can find this function in the dashboard under “Pages>>Add New”. Then click “All Pages” and move your mouse cursor over the “Sitemap” one you just made. You’ll see it points to a link. This gives you the ID of your page.

http://whichlight.com/wp-admin/post.php?post=1266&action=edit

In my case it’s 1266. Now ssh onto your server and navigate to the folder with all of your blog templates. Its under

wp-content/themes/<your-theme>/

Here copy your Page template and call it page-ID.php. In my case it was “page-1266.php”. You can really begin with any template, or you don’t have to. I just find it easier to start with something.

In my template, my structure is as follows:

  • Header
  • Sitemap
  • Enormous Tag Cloud (optional)
  • Sidebar
  • Footer

For the “Sitemap”, as the name reveals, contains all the meat for this page. For each category, I write the following

<h2> Category Name </h2>

<ul>
<?php
global $post;
$args = array(‘numberposts’ => -1, ‘category’ => category_ID );
$myposts = get_posts( $args );
foreach( $myposts as $post ) :  setup_postdata($post); ?>
<li><a href=”<?php the_permalink(); ?>”><?php the_title(); ?></a></li>
<?php endforeach; ?>
</ul>

I’ve bolded the things you fill in for each category.  I just simply copy and pasted this snippet for each category.   Here is an example for my blog posts:

<h2> Blog </h2>

<ul>
<?php
global $post;
$args = array(‘numberposts’ => -1, ‘category’ => 284 );
$myposts = get_posts( $args );
foreach( $myposts as $post ) :  setup_postdata($post); ?>
<li><a href=”<?php the_permalink(); ?>”><?php the_title(); ?></a></li>
<?php endforeach; ?>
</ul>

 

The Tag Cloud is just something I like.

  <h2>Super Tag Cloud </h2>
<div id=’tagcloud’><?php wp_tag_cloud(array(‘number’    => 0) ); ?> </div>

 

And that’s it!

Increase maximum upload with wordpress on Dreamhost

I searched a while for this.  I want to be able to increase the upload size for files on a wordpress blog.  This comes in handy for things like music sets, or larger images.  I usually use FTP, but I want to add users to also be able to contribute larger media files without having them have to figure out FTP stuff.

Turns out that PHP is configured to have upload limits, the limit does not have to do with wordpress.

Found this sweet post which had a solution that actually worked.

yeaaaa!!! Expect to hear lots more PC//MM music now.  And probably other things too.